About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNBC 22
CSPAN 17
CSPAN2 14
CNNW 11
FBC 9
MSNBCW 6
CNN 4
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
SFGTV2 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 98
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
like trying to improve the education system. the fund mental things are what we need to work on. not just that we are growing faster in 2013 but for many years thereafter. >> christine, you make the point all the time. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at the numbers and compare the average to those with college degree, it's half. the unemployment rate is half. >> i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. they have a degree, student debt. they're not in the labor market yet. the first job you have. the first foot on. the first foot on the ladder is so important to lifetime achievement. it's a country eating your young. good education but there is an opportunity for the education once you get into the labor market. >> christine, diane, ken. thanks for joining us. good conversation about the jobs report. let's see what the future holds in terms of jobs. all right. does this man scare you? if you're a republican in congress the answer is probably yes. in the last three weeks, more lawmakers have said they are don
thing. there are possibly other things which are trickier, like trying to improve the education system, but sort of these fundamental things, what we need to work on. not just that we're growing a little faster in 2013, but for many years there after. >> christine, you make this point all the time, actually. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at these numbers and compare the average to those with a college degree. it's half. the unplace of employment rate is half. >> it is, but i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. so they've got a degree, debt, they're not in the labor market yet, so they haven't been able to get into that group that has half the employment of everything else. they're having a tough time and as we know, that first job you have, that first foot on the first rung -- >> those sort, up to the age of 30 is higher. up to 11. >> that first step on the ladder is so important to your lifetime earnings, achievement. as a country, it's eati ining y if you can't figure out a good edge kax, but there's an opp
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
schools more competitive and at least one education watcher is hearing all of this and worrying about the costly fixes and wondering, if we are just compounding the problem. our guest is from the education action group much the longer you are in school the more you are inclined to remember what you learn, the smarter you get, the more competitive our kids get and on and on. >>guest: that seems good on its face but you have this notion that quantity is better than quality. what states need to look at is quality. the type of instructor, are they effective? ineffective? the trouble is, we have fought been able to determine that because we don't have a good evaluation system for teachers and unions are blocking that and protecting ineffective teachers. >> there is no guarantee that the districts that the effective teachers will teach more? >>guest: no, if you have ineffective teacher it doesn't matter how long your kid in there. what you need to focus is on teacher quality. what makes an effective teacher? that is what they should focus on. >>neil: leak you i travel a bit and around the w
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
the european union. despite anti-discrimination laws, they have little access to education or public services in several european countries. >> we need more than just words from the e you. brussels can launch proceedings over treaty violations and holds member states to account this way and other areas, but so far, not over discrimination a menorahs. >> amnesty international nevertheless concludes that the you deserves the nobel peace prize for its peace-building policies over the past six decades. >> the very last issue of the financial times coach lynn hit the stands today with a bit of humor. >> gallows humor, that is. the front page carried the headline "finally in the black" and it was called "the final time storage line." >> but the business side has been no laughing matter. a direct losses every year since it started publication back in 2000. and finally in the black -- an ironic reference to the fact that in its entire 13-year history, "the financial times to richland" never made a profit. >> we did not have a chance to build up our readership over decades. whoever enters the market l
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
. and education could be cut by more than $4 billion. 100,000 children could lose their place in headstart. the white house says more than 25,000 teachers and aides could lose their jobs. the national education association, it puts that number even higher, closer 2080,000 jobs lost. mark moriel is the president of the national urban league and will cain is a cnn contributor and jane zahadi is a writer at cnn money. mark, all of this, all of this, is if they go over the fiscal cliff and they don't fix it, and they never fix it, right, the worst case scenario. my question for you. so much talk about taxes for the rich but isn't it true if the sequester goes into effect and isn't fix this will d disproportionately hurt the poor? >> it would because it would be tax increases on middle and working class americans and hard cuts across the board in defense and domestic programs, including education and job training so there's -- >> 700,000 mothers and children will lose nutrition assistance and 80,000 fewer child care subsidies and 14,000 fewer homeless would receive assistance. this is what agen
are doing that with education, by the way, any profit sector in education, is a competitor to what the government does. is there any truth to that, do you think? >> i mean the decision to give a charitable gift is driven by helping the community directly. when it goes through government, i mean we see every day the inefficiency of that, that the charity's mission starts to drift towards what the government wants rather than what the community wants, rather than the mission of the organization. david: private charity is more efficient? stuart: more basic point, when the government does so called charitable work, it is essentially distributing money, it is buying votes. liz: that's right. stuart: when a private charity does good, there's no vote buying. it is an efficient delivery of service. am i crazy? >> added to that is that many of these charities do rely upon local state and federal money for some of their programs. they are already getting a major cut in all of that to begin with. then you add to that this? liz: yeah. it's upside down and backwards the way the white house and
want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themselves into. is obama has been very clever here, the president. i think what he's done is skillfully said to the public, if he goes over the fiscal cliff, the republicans are prepared to make the entire middle class to pay more tax to save 2% of the wealthiest americans paying a little bit more. and that's a very bad position for t
. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. [laughter] americans are compassionate people. there is a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. those obligations are beyond dispute. the real debate is how best we can meet them. it is whether they are better met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. t
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
'm not here to make friends. my job is not just to teach and entertain, but to educate. so call me. all right let's be honest. if you are like me, and you are thinking this whole kit and caboodle, it is getting real on the market. it is very hard to pry off. hence today's action again. the dow is down. nasdaq giving up and paint drying. and we are go to hear from a banker later on in the show. we heard about a weakening consumer today from the owner of darden. which happens to be part of the "mad money" staff. finished down 8.9%. it yields 42%. but, that yield might not be the protection it used to be. that more than doubles the tax on dividends. we saw one of the biggest retail jugger nauts, the gap. sales have become sloppy to surrender $3.57 or 10%. although that doesn't spell the death of retailers, we go off the charts tonight. and we witnessed downward pressure in the oil sector. today is the first day when the group got any lift at all. so what do we do? is it game over for equities should i go home? no, no, no. let me first say absolutely not. we have to get either to a cliff resoluti
. i'm not here to make friends. my job is not just to teach and entertain, but to educate. so call me. all right let's be honest. if you are like me, and you are thinking this whole kit and caboodle, it is getting real on exhausting. it's getting real on the market. one, it's very hard to pry off. and today's blah action again. nasdaq giving up 1.87%. fortunately we'll hear from a real banker. later in the show. heard about a weakened consumers today from not only than darden. a particular favorite to the "mad money" stf. stock pummeled and finished down. a stable operation. it yields an astounding 4.22%. scoop it up. but, may not be the protection. it doubles the tax on dividends. can't be in there saying -- darden. one of the biggest retail juggernauts. the gap. sales have become sloppy to surrender $3.57 or 10%. although that doesn't spell the death of retailers, we go off the charts tonight. sectors are really doing -- how are they doing? we just witnessed -- relentless pressure in the oil sector. the department doesn't believe going over the cliff will stifle energy command. toda
cannot go to school. i think malala will become the symbol of a girl's rights to education. >> well said. i couple of contemporary issues, one here and one back in our homeland. first one is the fiscal cliff. you're one of the keener economic minds in great britain. what do you make of what's happening in america? the old expression if america sneezes, we all catch a cold back in europe, as true as ever. what do you think should be happening here to try and get a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt people are working very hard to get a deal. i wish their discussions -- well, now we have the president re-elected and we have a new congress. i think it's right they get them to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby big powers try to rebuild confidence in the world. yes, have you to sort out the fiscal problems. yes, you also have to have growth because that's
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
, the left will find little things about texas. they'll say terrible in education. nobody's health care is covered. >> listen, if we were terrible -- >> and health care. >> -- but why would all the businesses copt to -- >> that's what they'll say. there's all the problems with texas. it's a horrible place. and nobody's covered by health insurance. the other knock is that i guess a lot of the business development is -- i don't know, what do they say, you've got these grants you give to private corporations. cronyism capitalism? >> we are competitive. >> they point to something and say what is it, federal, state grants to companies. >> it's called competition. >> is it crony capitalism? >> in the real world that's how you compete, you compete for those businesses. listen rick scott in florida is a competitor, bobby jindal, susan martinez, they are all competing for those businesses. if you want to sit there -- i'll give you a good example. i think the martin o'malley, former -- or still -- former dn -- >> he's in virginia now, right? >> no. i think he's up in maryland. >> yeah, yeah, yeah
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
to educate him. and i am very passionate as many americans are about our second amendment rights, and so i was originally just trying to explain to him. i wasn't trying to be nasty. i was really trying to make him understand where this debate was coming from, and he backed me into a corner and so i came back with a musket. >> well, i think that musket thing was absolutely terrific. but i've got to ask you, i need some help here. i'm going on the piers morgan show tonight. we're going to talk about taxes and regulation spending. so i'm not going to tweet, carol. i'm actually going to be there signature across from him. what should i do? >> i think you'll be fine. piers kind of tends to go to the socialist side of things. he's from britain originally, and he doesn't understand the capitalist system all the time. so i think if you and i just keep educating him, keep explaining to him things like the second amendment, like the free enterprise system, like capitalism, i think eventually it will get through to him. >> how is free enterprise doing? how is free market capitalism doing? i'm kind of
education and training programs is still unclear, as the suggestions are only recommendations to eu member states. >> bayern face off against a byelorussian team tonight. >> boresoff beat them in november. bayern are in top form. >> as if they were not scoring enough goals already, goetze is ready to go. he is first choice again in the champions' league. bayern are looking to top the group with a victory. >> i am confident we will take the situation seriously and do our best to take first place so that we have the first leg in the next round away from home, which is a big advantage. >> badstuber will be missing after an injury. he will be replaced by another german international. that speaks volumes about their depth. as for their opponents, they were beaten by them 3-1. they are fired up, nonetheless. >> it is not every day you play against one of the biggest teams in the world. the team is excited. we want to show what we can do. >> it will not be a walk in the park for bayern, but it should give them a good workout, with tougher challenges ahead. >> we will be back with a look at transp
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - good morning, neighbour! (yawning) strrrretch with me! reach your hands up, like this! stretch, stretch, stretch. rrrah! that felt grr-ific! come on inside! morning, dad! - morning, dan
we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. -- thanks robbie for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we
careers to be productive in the workforce and to contribute. i think education is key. whether it be going to school part-time -- and i know these things cost money, but whether it be on-line or it be seeking some sort of education in another area to make sure that your skill set is diverse. >> you mentioned on-line. there is a lot of stuff on-line in a good way that you can actually gain some knowledge. >> absolutely. >> kyle always good to see you. thank you for joining us. you are leaving beautiful san diego behind. whatever, kyle. merry christmas in case i don't see you. >> happy holidays. >>> piles of debris line the streets and are hit hard by superstorm sandy. more than one month after it struck. but funding could soon be on the way to help get things back to normal. now more from washington. >> in a letter to congress, the white house has requested $60.4 billion to help all states affected by superstorm sandy. the white house says these are funds necessary to finance a needed recovery effort and to help the region prepare for future challengeds including future -- challenges includ
more spending on education and health care lessen spending on weapon systems. that's kind of the big picture. and whether it's nurture or nature, who cares. the idea is that women really need to be at the table and we need to be at the table in large enough numbers that the perspective that women do bring to the table will be heard and will have an impact. >> on the surface, it's hard to disagree with that. but in practice i'm wondering if it's that easy. obviously the idea is to get the best person possible and i'm wondering if it's realistic when you factor in who actually wants to be in public service, who can get confirmed, sort of who is in that pipeline. are there enough women even in the pipeline at this point? >> i don't think there's any question that there's enough women in the pipeline. you know, there are just so many women out there and we may not know their names, you and i. the public may not know their names but clearly women have been entering the pipeline since the 1970s. there are highly competent excellent public servants that are out there and whether they are kn
with the education of little kids teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions for this to work, and it can't happen overnight. so as i said, part of the problem is they've created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> you expressed some pessimism or realism about what's likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops that'll be back, essentially, to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that which is islamist, which is semi-democratic but with the emphasis on the semi and, of course, is nuclear armed? >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. and i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them, there will be circumstances where some nuance and potential compromise is required, then you approach all of these problems that way. if you have very good intell
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
poverty. highlighting things like education are a path laid to burning the right to be heard. because a lot of communities are saying we just don't believe that you care about us. i think that having folks who communicate well is a ticket to making that hard battle happen. greg: i read his books and offense. your latest one, you revert to the republican party as hard wing conservatives. that they are being pushed into political relevance. >> yes, for example, the fight over the fiscal cliff is taking place between speaker boehner and the white house. they put republicans in the senate in a rare type of position where they are in the game, but they are not the leaders of the game. see what is going on in the senate in general. we're republicans should have the majority of the senate, if not highly ontological candidates were nominated by the party base. thinking of someone like richard murdoch in indiana. there's no reason the democrats should not hold that seat. they are putting republicans in the senate at a disadvantage. >> the other thing is that ted cruz is a tea party candidate,
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
their skills or education. for these americans, they have to be unemployed americans, you have an entire generation moving to the workforce right now that are not doing the key things they need to do. managing projects, managing budgets, managing people in order to get more income throughout their career. connell: they are educated. they are overeducated. one of the things he talk about all the time is we have to have our education system came and keep up with the world. what are you afraid of? >> my biggest concern, here we are in the holiday season, and there is a personal side on this, every single one of these numbers represent an individual that is trying very hard. the problem here is a long-term thing. if you cannot take that intellectual capital and put it to work for america and for america's principles, you are looking at a country that is at a disadvantage. connell: give us an idea of what you think we should be doing that we are not? >> i think one of the quick fixes is simply stepping back on a day like this when people are finding out, hill about the fiscal cliff and unders
to education. to educate the younger people and the population we need to get out and work for what you have. stuart: i am beginning to like you. washington politicians bicker over the fiscal cliff, very frustrating. at the end of the day we're going to look more like europe. my take on that is next. charles: wall street doesn't have to face tim cook. >> ruled this video tape back in the new year. this will be apple's those profitable quarter ever. rolled this case back. make fun of me later. i am saying it. of the one that was clayton morris in the last hour making a bold prediction of apple. the stock has been getting back but right now it is down a bit more, $6 lower at 11:40. let's check the overall market of 44 points putting the dow above 13,100. netflix shares up again. nicole: this is showing resiliency for netflix. this is a stock people thought would be to the downside based on what we heard. we heard they posted something on facebook, regulated, they are upset with them so we have regulators now warning netflix about exactly that, they can't just postings on facebook. they have to
ask americans today what are republicans for, they don't have a solution. education, by the way, is a good one. i think republicans should be talking about choice. charter schools, vouchers, anything that give minorities more opportunities. >> david? >> look, i'm in favor of the republicans being a low tax party. here's the danger. when republicans say taxes, they mean income taxes. 80% of americans now pay more in payroll taxes than they pay in income taxes. payroll taxes will go up at the end of the year. the payroll tax holiday will end. that's a big tax increase for everybody. 80% of americans pay more. and where is the republican plan to hold the line on those people's taxes? if taxes only mean the tax, the income tax portion of tax burden for four-fitz four fifths of the country, you're talking about something that doesn't matter that much. and in a democracy, you cannot be a successful party if you talk about things that don't matter that much to four fifths of the country. >> all right, your paycheck, your investment, your home, they may all be taxed a bit differently ne
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ ♪ >>> at times, i know it can feel like the entire world is stacked against you in this game. >> the house of pain. >> europe's in a nasty recession, united states could be on the verge, well, of returning to the great recession because our leaders can't rise above and agree on anything. and china's still struggling to get their act together and beat their own slowdown. although the communists seem to be doing a pretty good job of breathing new life into their economy. look at that market last night. when you take a global view, all right, things stagnant. but there are still some bright spots out there. and believe it or not, one of the brightest is mexico. that's right. mexico has been getting its act together, industrial and automobile production south of the border are on the rise. and they're growing gdp faster than we are in the united states, much faster. just two days ag
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >>> better than expected numbers on the labor front for november out this morning. u.s. businesses added 146,000 jobs last month and the unemployment rate slipped to 7.7%, the lowest level in four years. of course, that's not the whole story because you had more people dropping out of the labor force. >> well, the former chairman of the council of economic advisers, now a senior fellow at the hoover institution. he joins us with his reaction. would you give it a, what, out of ten? >> i gave you part of the answer too, by the way. you're welcome. >> out of ten, what score would you give this report, ed? >> i
you save some money. my job is not just to entertain you but i'm trying to educate and teach you. call me. 1-800-743-cnbc. you want to get a sense of just how important this -- i hate to even say it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is mo
. and that think it's a venture but education. if greece serious about doing education will have to happen or as enough effort that there would have been dozens of discussions going on in the meetings afterwards . i don't think there is any magical language or words that we can use, although we have to struggle with what it is. we do have to think about how we organize ourselves to take on this incredibly powerful system that really does work just by hammer you over the head, through markets, and it works through liberal democracy. empire doesn't just work. it's not just when america goes into iraq. >> liberal democracy. [inaudible] and have, you know. [inaudible] >> i would say that with -- within the need to understand is how capitalism functions as a system. and the extent to which the state as we now have it is, in fact, a state. it is very poor in the weight is structured in every policy that is given to it as a reform, those reforms are structured in ways so as to reproduce capitalist social relations. so as not just a matter of democratizing and speaking of the need to turn bank
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. that makes watching tv even better. if your tv were a hot dog, zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french mustard. just like adding fancy mustard to a hotdog makes you go "woah!," zeebox adds video, info, and playalongs to spice up your favorite shows. download zeebox free and say "woah" every time you watch tv. >>> we have a big week for the bond market. we have key auctions all throughout the week. then the big jobs report on friday. you might expect some volatility. rick san tell sli tratelli is t action at the cme. >> the fed meeting most likely will show us that operation oliver twist turns into operation i love treasuries. probably more treasury buying. if you look at a two-day -- i picked two-days because i think it sends the point home -- we've escalated up just a bit on yields you see on right side of the chart. remember we had a three-year week ism headline, three year weak in terms of the employment index right before we get
categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we should support that and we have to address that and recognize it and talk about it. and maybe we haven't talked enough about that. i don't think that's the way to appeal to minority voters, that's the way to i
by polar records, you keep going for it. in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. when we got married. i had three kids. and she became the full time mother of three. it was soccer, and ballet, and cheerleading, and baseball. those years were crazy. so, as we go into this next phase, you know, a big part of it for us is that there isn't anything on the schedule. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... w
to address the educational demands of the mothers. these children are taking english classes. ♪ wednesday, thursday, friday >> reporter: both the government and the company pay for the center. employees can enroll their children for free. >> translator: because the child care center is in the building, i can look in o >> translator: we really value our female employees. we think that this child care system is the best way to support the parents and allow them to work without worrying about their kids. >> reporter: people will be watching to see whether this kind of support makes it easier for mothers to keep working. anna jung, nhk world, seoul. >>> famed brazilian architect oscar niemeyer, who designed his country's capital city as well as some of the world's most distinctive buildings is dead at 104. niemeyer was born in brazil in 1907. he began his career in the 1930s after graduating from a local university. he was one of the architects that designed the u.n. headquarters in new york, a project that began in 1947. in 1956, niemeyer created a series of landmark structures for brazil's
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)